So, who are you?

My name is Gustav Andersson and I grew up in Gothenburg, on the west coast of Sweden. I played around a lot with computers in my childhood but didn’t actually get into programming much until University. I played games and created graphics and a lot of music. Initially with archaic tracker programs like Protracker.

I studied electrical engineering at Chalmers University of Technology, with a masters in Signals and System. I built some guitar FX boxes as a teenager and was interested in understanding their inner workings, though eventually I drifted more towards programming and digital signal processing and away from analog circuits.

How did you end up here at MIND Music Labs?

I replied to a job ad posted in the Electronic Music Studio email list and then got the job, Haha! Long story short, I had spend a number of years working as a consultant in software engineering and was in a place where I wanted to not only code, but also incorporate more of my interests and work with something I cared more deeply about. And then I almost stumbled upon this job ad from a company with this incredibly cool smart guitar they were prototyping. Being a guitarist, I wanted it from the start and felt I needed to get in touch with them. Fortunately the feeling was mutual and they hired me.

What is your role at MIND Music Labs?

I mostly work on coding the audio and control processing layers in user space. The part that sits on top of the system (which deals with all the low-level audio handling and latency) and does the audio DSP, midi decoding and similar stuff. I have written the bulk of the code that makes up Sushi, the plugin host and DAW that runs in ELK, our MusicOS. It is mostly audio routing and infrastructure for hosting other peoples DSP code, but sometimes I get the chance to code some cool sound generating code as well. Since moving to a larger office, I have also taken on the role as the office gardener!

What is the most challenging part of your job?

Being a small and tight team requires you to be able to wear many hats and sometimes you need to do things way out of what would normally be required in your role. If there’s no one to do a solder job you have to do it, even if that’s not what you signed on for. And sometimes you need to drop everything you’re doing to prepare a demo for an investor or potential partner. But that’s part of startup life!

Best guitar solo ever?

I remember being very fond of John Frusciante’s solo towards the end of Parallel Universe by RHCP, it’s just a couple of notes with lots of feedback noise and a ton of effects. But it’s a very emotional noise 🙂 I’m more interested in sounds and textures than impressive technique or how many notes per second you can play, I guess.

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